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  • Oh, this fuckin thing!

    AChicken posted: »

    I've recently been pointed to this video. If anyone enjoying the tense atmosphere of WandaVision hasn't seen this yet, check it out. It's a

  • After watching Mandalorian S2, I finally decided to sit down and watch the original Star Wars trilogy for the first time in YEARS!!

    It's still just as phenomenal as I remember. The use of special effects (Apart from the corny CGI which were added in DVD/Blu Ray versions) is mindblowing, even to this date. The story was awesome, the acting aged well, the characters are all likable (C-3PO, not so much) and the soundtracks are just iconic as always.

  • Everyone and their grandmother has been recommending Community to me for years. Finally got around to watching it and I can see why.

  • edited February 2021

    I tried getting into that, as I saw the first two episodes a couple months ago, but I just don't really get it. The main guy seems like such a dick most of the time and I can't stand him. (I probably -- definitely -- should have given it more time, but I'll revisit it another time. Maybe it just didn't click in that moment.)

    (Fun fact: I now consider Netflix Canada to be superior to Netflix USA, as we still have 3 major NBC sitcoms, while the US has had most of theirs eaten up by Peacock. -- So that's The Office (heheheh), Community and recently Parks and Rec.) :smirk:

    ralo229 posted: »

    Everyone and their grandmother has been recommending Community to me for years. Finally got around to watching it and I can see why.

  • edited February 2021

    I watched and finished the anime series Erased this past week. Yeah, it lives up to the hype.
    It's a nice mystery/thriller about a guy -- Satoru -- who gets sent back in time as his 10-year-old self, where he has to stop the kidnapping and murder of 3 kids in his hometown, starting with the class loner: Kayo Hinasuki.

    I really enjoyed the mystery aspect, and they really hook you with episodes that end on juuust the right cliffhanger to keep you interested. Now, this is either because the show does a bad job at hiding it, or I'm actually smart for a change - but I managed to predict the kidnapper's identity 3 episodes before it was revealed! That was pretty cool to me, as I never really manage to do that.

    Spoiler-wise, especially about the ending, the final few episodes and wrap-up of the story is pretty lackluster. After spending so much of the season trying to stop the kidnapping of the first victim, the next two victims get saved fairly quickly before the MC jumps back into the present. It's here that we find the kidnapper eager to kill the MC after a 15-year coma (despite the fact that he could have just killed him while he was in a coma wtf dude it's easy), some unexplained revelations about the kidnapper 'unable to live without the MC' in some sort of bond/fondness(?) as well as the total side-lining of the main romance between Satoru and Kayo in favour of a different love interest who barely had any screen time.

    Also spoiler-wise, there's a neat detail near the end of the show that I just can't help but mention: So, after the killer is revealed and Satoru confronts him, he ends up getting trapped in a car and rolled into a lake. It's at this point that you'd think he's dead and the show pushes this unease even further in the next episode with the intro completely removing his presence entirely. Every other character appears as normal, but he's completely absent from it. Creepy, but a nice touch.

    I've heard that the anime deviates somewhat from the manga, so that's got to be why some of it is disappointing.
    Surprisingly, Netflix Japan made a live-action adaptation of the manga in 2016, and it's considered by many to be the superior version. I'll definitely get to that soon and report back. Never heard of a case where the 2nd adaptation in a shift from animation to live-action is better. That's very interesting...

  • edited February 2021

    I finished The Spectacular Spider-Man tonight. Damn, what a great show. I'd agree with the others that this is the definitive television take on the character.
    And what a damn shame that it was never renewed past Season 2. It was a fantastic season, had set up a lot of new plot threads and was really enjoyable.

    Season 1 is pretty good, though it's hampered by having a lot of super-villain set-ups and origin stories. Tombstone is a pretty interesting threat and this version of the character is like an evil philanthropist. That's cool.
    There's also the increasing presence and threat of the Green Goblin that I think the show handles really well.
    Each villain has their own 3-4 episode arc where they wreak havoc on the city, Spidey gets involved and usually there's a deep conspiracy happening behind the scenes.
    Overall, and I'm not saying that Season 1 is bad, just that Season 2 really improves upon the established characters and plotlines in great ways.

    Spoilers ahead

    What makes Season 2 so great in my eyes is that it blends together so many tense plotlines to make some really great arcs.
    That, and it shows a lot of artistic flair -- both through the season being set in the Winter (plenty of new snowy versions of different locales, new winter clothes, and the fact that it's not just a backdrop. It ties into the cold season and holidays that surround it.
    There's also the back half of Season 2 that uses a lot of neat framing devices. One episode about Flash Thompson's birthday party is framed with a bunch of recordings of characters talking into a camera: mentioning their history with Flash and what they think of him. It all builds up nicely into the final reveal of Eddie Brock/Venom returning by secretly crashing Flash's party. A few episodes later, Spidey's identity is announced to the city, and throughout the episode a reporter from the Daily Bugle interviews close friends of Peter on whether they believe Spidey and him are one and the same -- they all laugh it off, which is fun. Finally, later in the show there's a neat juxtaposition of (slightly edited) lines from A Midsummer Night's Dream versus the current battle Spidey is fighting. It's very unique in its presentation and I really enjoyed that.
    Finally, there's the whole romance plot that you can really get invested in since it's got all of Peter's iconic love interests in the show at once, vying for his attention. Mary Jane, Gwen Stacy, Liz Allan. It's a lot for Peter to juggle and it's really tense to watch.

    Don't get me started on the fight scenes, they're awesome. Spider-Man is extremely quippy, much to the dismay of the baddies, there's a lot of acrobatic tricks and Spidey usually lures enemies into neat traps or turns their talent against themselves.
    One scene later in Season 2 is really memorable, with a bunch of gang lords fighting each other, all set to this opera music playing in the theater below them. Really artsy, but really cool.
    The show even explores really interesting themes and character dynamics, where Sandman gets persuaded to help Spidey save civilians rather than fighting him, and Rhino even helps take down a mob too.

    Finally, the ending of the show -- a whole bunch of shock revelations surrounding the Green Goblin, an epic fight across the city -- one that leaves Spidey in a battle-damaged suit (that's when you know it's getting serious). That culminates in a twist that really shakes up how you'll view the first season and ends the show on a pretty high climax. (Where it turns out Harry was framed by his own father to be the GG.) I do have a bit of an issue with the ending being super rushed though. I get that there's a strict TV time-limit, but after the final Goblin fight -- where Norman flies into his own bomb trap, killing him, we don't get any time to see Peter wrestle with the fact that he probably killed a man (unintentionally) and the show ends where the original Sam Raimi Spider-Man ends: in a graveyard at Norman Osborn's headstone, with Harry furious and swearing vengeance on Spider-Man. However, it does have a reveal where Norman is actually alive and somehow faked his own death... too bad that'll never be expanded upon.

    In short, watch this show if you enjoy Spider-Man. It's really good.
    Here's my pick for the most wholesome and hilarious quip of the series. Thank goodness someone clipped it.

  • edited February 2021

    Nice!! I watched this show again last week and still had a lot of fun. Before I decided to watch it for the first time, I was skeptical due the character designs because they look weird as fuck.

    I always hated the part where Peter just breaks up with Liz just for someone he couldn't even get engaged with at the end (Because Pete wanted Harry to have someone to care for after witnessing the thought-to-be death of his father). Liz proved to be the best girlfriend for Peter in this show and I totally mean better than both Gwen and Mary Jane. She cared about him a lot and always forgave him for his absences, unlike Gwen. Then whoopie di fucking doo, Green Goblin wasn't dead after all and Pete ended up all alone.

    Overall, this is an awesome show but I just hate how it ended in Season 2. Fuck you, Disney and fuck your reboots for the web-head.

    AChicken posted: »

    I finished The Spectacular Spider-Man tonight. Damn, what a great show. I'd agree with the others that this is the definitive television tak

  • edited February 2021

    I agree. I felt pretty bad for Liz at the end too, especially since she just lost her brother, basically. (I think. The show doesn't often do a good job in showing how much time passes between episodes.)
    I think it was a pretty interesting plotline to have Peter be unsure of who he truly loves and is torn between two of the girls. I think it sends an interesting message that the first person you love won't necessarily be "the one". Still sucks for Liz though, no doubt.
    Honestly they made me care about Flash's love story in the end, too. The dude actually wants to improve himself to win the heart of this girl.

    Part of me is hoping that because the unfinished DC show "Young Justice" recently got a revival season to finish it, (right?), that one day some Disney executive might realize "Hey, we should really make a show that people really love and bring back Spectacular for one final wrap-up." Super unlikely, but companies love to cash in on nostalgia these days...

    AronDracula posted: »

    Nice!! I watched this show again last week and still had a lot of fun. Before I decided to watch it for the first time, I was skeptical due

  • Super unlikely, but companies love to cash in on nostalgia these days...

    There are a few movements on Twitter for Marvel to continue Spectacular Spider-Man. If I remember correctly, it got enough traction to reach the VA of Peter Parker and he liked and retweeted a bunch of posts in favor of it. So I guess it's not entirely impossible.

    AChicken posted: »

    (Spoiler) Part of me is hoping that because the unfinished DC show "Young Justice" recently got a revival season to finish it, (right?),

  • Mythic Quest: Raven's Banquet is a fun, if exaggerated sitcom about the videogame industry and the crazy archetypes within it.

    I've seen the whole first season, except the Quarantine special, since that was conceived of after the release of the show, so I'm not including it here... yet.

    The show revolves around a games company called MQ (Or just Mythic Quest) and the people who need to keep their MMORPG game successful and innovative. The characters do feel like exaggerated parodies of what you'd normally find in today's game studios, which was a bit off-putting at first, but either the writers found the character's stride later or I just got used to them over time, the further you get into the series the more you understand some of them.
    You've got the overbearing Creative Director Ian, the money-hungry Monetization head Brad, the Lead Engineer Poppy who must bend to the manic will of the CD, and the old-fashioned, awards-seeking head writer C.W. Longbottom as some examples of the main players.

    The show starts out okay, with some hit-or-miss jokes and some okay plotlines, though in the second half of the show, some bigger arcs get planted and the humour just seems to improve from then on. Not sure why, though it might just be me getting used to it. It's your typical "situational comedy", really, centered around gaming topics of creative control, toxic player bases, microtransactions and the like.
    Also in the second half, some characters really get fleshed out and character dynamics change for the better. Throughout the first half, you've got Ashly Burch (Rachel) and Imani Hakim (Dana) playing two beta-testers in the studio and they really don't get much to do. Ashly has many scenes where she's contemplating confessing her love to her colleague, but the scenes don't do much outside of that in a dark, dimly-lit room. Luckily in the second half, Dana gets a job as a streamer and leaves her testing job. It still leaves Rachel fawning over her by watching her streams instead (and not really doing her testing job), but does pepper in a bit of a new character dynamic with the entitled, sexist new tester Lou.
    The other character that was pretty off-putting near the start of the series was Jo, the new intern to the studio. With her socio/psychopathic-like personality and powerful need to please Ian, she was a bit of a strange character in the show. Later, she improves with the idea that she's just someone who has a desperate need to please and serve her superiors, but that's the one character I just don't seem to understand why they're there or who they may be parodying.

    One thing is really certain, though, is that the mid-season episode "A Dark Quiet Death" is a fantastic stand-alone episode. It is about the rise and fall of a game company that gets too big for its boots, with Jake Johnson and Cristin Miloti at the guest leads "Doc" and "Bean" for that episode. It was pretty grounded and touching, in contrast to the rest of the show. I'd highly recommend you check it out.

  • Welp, the internet around here is quite slow today, causing Netflix to stream in pretty low quality with some long buffers.
    Thankfully I got Korra on DVD for Christmas, so this is a blessing in disguise.

    First two episodes down, got some first impressions.

    • Korra is an interesting shift from Aang. She's headstrong, brash, older than 12. She's got 3/4 elements learned (but not totally mastered). This is going to be cool to see.
    • The shift to a more modern, industrial revolution setting is a bit crazy, but I assume at the very least 100 years have passed between ATLA and Korra. If they managed to find electricity to power machines soon after ATLA, I'm sure that would give a big enough push for planes, cars, and streetcars to start getting made, especially after the Fire Nation was already making some of those vehicles.
    • Katara is alive! That's neat. I don't expect to see much of her, since this show seems to be about Korra's time at Republic city, but it's cool to see her mentoring another Avatar, in some way.
    • There seems to be a class issue subplot building up in the world, with Benders and the Avatar having a higher standing than non-benders. I wonder how gracefully this show might handle that, or what it will build up to.
    • Tenzin -- JK Simmons -- is a fun mentor figure so far. He clashes well with Korra's personality. I like his children as well, they provide a lot of cute, comic relief.
    • The music in this show is really awesome, too! It's very big and orchestral, fitting the big new world this is.
    • Finally, I can't help but think how well a setting like Republic City could translate to an Avatar-based game. Just think: Sony's InFamous series mixed with the raw elements of Water, Earth, Fire, Air, and the sub-bending genres. That would be awesome!

    I know not to expect the same deal as ATLA, and I know already that the pacing is quite fast. Hopefully theres some good in this series that is usually overshadowed by its predecessor.
    1. I know Nickelodeon didn't treat this show well, so they ordered it season-by-season. There won't be any multi-season arcs.
    2. I also know that they didn't treat it well on-air, with the final season just being dumped on their website, as well as limiting the budget and resorting to clip-show episodes.
    Thank goodness they finally saw the money-making opportunity in it. This world is cool.

  • So Aang lived until the age of 66 (his years in the iceberg did some damage to him and it caused him to die relatively young), and Korra is 16 I believe at the start of the show. Aang was 12 at the end of the show, so that means Korra takes place about 70 years later.

    There was some business agreements and partnerships made after the war involving the Fire Nation and the rest of the world, which ends up leading to some heavy industrialization and tech advancements. Some of this stuff is explored in the Avatar comics that take place a couple of years after the show.

    Tenpin is one of my favorite characters in the show, and it helps that he’s played by one of my favorite actors in JK Simmons.

    There were a few Avatar games made back in the day, and a moderately successful one for TLOK, but it was removed about a year or so ago and can’t be bought online anymore.

    Glad you’re enjoying it so far. Like you mentioned, Korra is a season by season show, so it doesn’t have an overarching arc like Avatar did. It was originally just meant to be a one season mini series, so it had a small team, which is why Mike and Bryan are the only writers for the first season. As it got more seasons, they were able to expand the writing team and brought back some Avatar veterans like Tim Hendrick and Joshua Hamilton.

    AChicken posted: »

    Welp, the internet around here is quite slow today, causing Netflix to stream in pretty low quality with some long buffers. Thankfully I go

  • Netflix's Pacific Rim: The Black came out today.

    It's a cool show so far, the Jager and Kaiju animation is pretty well-detailed and fun to watch. Unfortunately the human characters -- probably to differentiate them from the action-robot combat -- move at a slower frame rate. Gosh, it's getting annoying seeing that in so many 3D, Anime-inspired series. Most of the time, it just doesn't look right and in this case I'm sorry to say nothing's changed on that front.

    There's some cool voice actors though, notably with Gideon Adlon as the main character Hayley. You might know her better as Violet from TWD: Final Season. She's given a really good acting performance for this series so far, with great emotional beats.

    Nolan North appears briefly in the opening episode as a recorded hologram. There's also the VA Erica Lindbeck as the Jager AI, and who I can't place a specific character to, since she's been acting in so many games and tv series for a while now. I'm sure I've heard her somewhere before.

  • I recently watched Kid Cosmic on Netflix a few days ago. Decided to binge it based off the premise it looked interesting and I love kid's even as an adult just because their styles tend to be really nice and the plots are simple enough for kids to understand while having depth that adults can enjoy as well.

    The biggest compliment I have for the show is the soundtrack! Each episode has a different outro song and they are just absolutely wonderful! The garage-band-type sound the songs give off a specific fun and nostalgic feel I can't put my finger on. The soundtrack pairs very nicely with the art-style as well as it is very similar to The Loud House due to its comic-book style of animation and character design. It truly looks like the funnies section of the newspaper come to life and I live for it!

    The final thing I just want to talk about is something very personal to me and something I greatly appreciate. The basic plot is very simple: Kid finds 5 magic stones from an alien crash site that gives the holder (or wearer, technically, since he glues them to nuts to make them into rings) with special powers and assembles a team of heroes to fight aliens. The premise is very easy to understand and fun, but throughout the show, it's hinted that Kid's parents died in a car accident while he survived. Towards the end of the show, it becomes very obvious that Kid suffers from PTSD and has flashbacks when put into similar situations and experiences that remind him of the crash that took his parents' lives. They handle the topic VERY well and it astounds me that kids today will have something like Kid Cosmic to relate to when dealing with their trauma. It makes me wish I had something very similar growing up, and that's why I really like the show.

    If you have time and it sounds interesting enough to you, I highly recommend watching it, even if it's just to appreciate the art style! It's a very good watch and I highly recommend watching it!

    '

  • edited March 2021

    it's hinted that Kid's parents died in a car accident while he survived. Towards the end of the show, it becomes very obvious that Kid suffers from PTSD and has flashbacks when put into similar situations and experiences that remind him of the crash that took his parents' lives.

    Wow that's pretty dark.

    I've seen this show appear recently on Netflix, and upon seeing the trailer I thought it would be a nice film rather than a long-ish series. The trailer didn't seem to have much interesting variety other than "Aliens attack, a kid and his buddies have to stop them", so I was worried when I saw it was a tv series that the plot every episode could get stale if it was just that same conflict.

    But... it doesn't? If it's actually pretty good plot-wise, then I'll definitely give it a watch.

    chronogeo posted: »

    I recently watched Kid Cosmic on Netflix a few days ago. Decided to binge it based off the premise it looked interesting and I love kid's ev

  • edited March 2021

    I started the Netflix show City of Ghosts today.

    It's a nice calming show to have in the background while you're doing things. The show itself is pretty chill, simple kids' entertainment, but there's an adorable charm and draw to its educational messages and content, that can be useful and entertaining to adults, too.

    The show is about a group of kids in Los Angeles who investigate mysterious ghost sightings found across the many different boroughs of L.A.. While fun in a fictional sense, it's also celebration of the different cultures and history within these communities -- emphasized by the characters in the show being based on and voiced by actual L.A. kids and residents.
    The fact that this is all presented in a documentary style (with gorgeous IRL-rotoscoped backgrounds) makes everything easily and quietly digestible, perfect to have on while doing chores or you need to wind down. I love it.

  • Sounds like another win for Craig McCracken! Will definitely check this out as soon as I can.

    chronogeo posted: »

    I recently watched Kid Cosmic on Netflix a few days ago. Decided to binge it based off the premise it looked interesting and I love kid's ev

  • I just saw Battle at Big Rock which is a mini film and takes place after Jurassic World : Fallen Kingdom.

  • My ongoing quest to relive the mid 2000's era of television continues. I finished Warehouse 13 (very much enjoyed it and thought it was a really fun show but you can tell it got cancelled because the last season feels pretty rushed) a few days ago and started watching Eureka.

    I'll probably watch Reaper next, but after that I have no idea.

    If anyone has any recommendations for early to mid 2000's tv shows, preferably light hearted ones, tell me :grimace:

  • edited March 2021

    Finished the premiere season of Pacific Rim: The Black.

    The show follows two siblings, Hayley and Taylor, who are living in Australia and must set out and find their parents and a safe haven after a Kaiju finds their settlement. Along the way, they come across shady organizations trying to take control of a fractured world, giant monsters, a mysterious abandoned child, and one big robot -- a Jager.
    I'm not too familiar with the movie series' plot (I've seen them, but I don't remember much apart from the big CGI fight scenes -- especially for the sequel film :#) the lore that it dives into for this series is pretty interesting and I like how it focuses a lot on Drifting -- the process of linking two human brains to a Jager AI in order to control it. The idea of needing two people to share memories, feelings, and bonds to pilot a giant mech is super cool and the sequences that use it are very neat.

    There's some odd dialogue, the low-character-frame-rate doesn't fit for me, and some voice-acting involving excited characters are where it can get weird (people laughing in a scene with very little reason and it goes on a bit long). Apart from that it's very enjoyable.
    It was an entertaining, action-packed animated series. The monster designs are simple but awesome. I'm excited to see what they'll do in the future, especially given the cliffhanger. (I'm hoping there's a surprise season 2 drop this year, as season 1 only had 7 episodes -- odd number -- maybe it released as one half of a full production season? Fingers crossed.) [Edit: it has been renewed for a Season 2]

    7/10

    On that note: RIP Joel. He was one of my favourite characters. It was really cool to see how -- despite the Drift marathon he went through that turned his brain into scrambled eggs, it also made him develop greater dexterity and abilities he otherwise hadn't had before. I was interested in seeing what they could do with him later down the line with this plot point, but he was used as a shock death. Damnit. Maybe that thread will be explored with someone else in the future...

  • Recently, I started watching Netflix's Daredevil.

    This show is amazing. Everything about it is just in your face, and it feels so real. Though it is really violent. Men get tortured, thrown off of roofs, and one man got his skull crushed by a fire extinguisher. (Odd choice of a weapon.)

    All in all, I really enjoy this show. And I hope Charlie Cox as Daredevil/Matt Murdock will make a return to the MCU.

  • Are the Netflix Marvel shows still considered canon. I feel like it'd be in Disney's character to come out and say they aren't and tell people to subscribe to Disney+.

    Recently, I started watching Netflix's Daredevil. This show is amazing. Everything about it is just in your face, and it feels so real. T

  • Kevin Feige came out defending the fans of the shows (netflix shows, agents of shield) a few weeks ago. Canon status is unclear but as long as they don't say anything else, it's canon.

    Are the Netflix Marvel shows still considered canon. I feel like it'd be in Disney's character to come out and say they aren't and tell people to subscribe to Disney+.

  • I finished the premiere season of Lost on Disney+. This show focuses on survivors of a plane crash who got stranded on an island in the middle of South Pacific ocean and they have to do whatever it takes to survive and get in contact with someone from a mainland to get help. The island where the survivors got stranded on isn't normal as any other islands in the world because the survivors hear a lot of strange noises, there are some mysterious landmarks and it seems like the island itself is messing with people's minds like it's alive or something.

    This show has great characters which some start off as either good, meh or assholes but the more the show goes on, the more I grow on them.

    Like Sawyer for example. I thought he was gonna be like the main antagonist due to how much of a selfish dork he is but near the end of Season 1, he grew on me. I still have yet to see because Season 1 ended with him being shot by those boat shitheads who kidnapped Walt and destroyed Michael's raft. For now, I hope he survives for the next season.

    There are like 8-15 main characters of the story while the rest of the plane survivors are just extras. Each main character gets a backstory before the plane crash in each episode which some are unique but some are kind of slowing the pacing down.

    The concept of this series appears to be my style and I am interested to watch the whole thing until the end. But the problem is that this show is very very long. Surprisingly so. I mean each season has 25 episodes and why? A concept like this doesn't seem like it needed 5 more seasons to tell a story. I just hope I do not lose interest like I how I did with The Walking Dead.

  • Its been literally forever since I watched Lost but you are def correct with the show being too long. I dont remember which season, but there was at least one that felt tacked on just because the show was hot shit and making bank rather than the story actually needing it.

    AronDracula posted: »

    I finished the premiere season of Lost on Disney+. This show focuses on survivors of a plane crash who got stranded on an island in the midd

  • I've heard that the show is pretty dang good, but the last 2 seasons are where it overstays its welcome and begins to fall apart.

    I think it was originally supposed to be only one season, but the popularity caused the channel to renew it again and again. The writers managed to construct a 4-ish season arc I think, and it's after that things go downhill.

    Poogers555 posted: »

    Its been literally forever since I watched Lost but you are def correct with the show being too long. I dont remember which season, but ther

  • Apparently, Lost was supposed to last only 3 seasons but ABC wanted to turn this show into their own mascot series like Spongebob and Simpsons. Last as long as people keep binging the show regardless of the ratings.

    Actually, they wanted 10 SEASONS of Lost. How is that even legal? It's a drama series, not a sitcom.

    AChicken posted: »

    I've heard that the show is pretty dang good, but the last 2 seasons are where it overstays its welcome and begins to fall apart. I think

  • Lol I remember last year a showrunner or Executive producer on the Walking Dead was confident the series could be around until 2028. AMC announced Season 11 being the final season soon after that. :grimace:

    AronDracula posted: »

    Apparently, Lost was supposed to last only 3 seasons but ABC wanted to turn this show into their own mascot series like Spongebob and Simpso

  • edited March 2021

    Lost is amazing and has some of the best characters i've ever seen,just don't expect the show to explain everything in the end, the last season's pretty amazing.

    I also recommend watching the Leftovers for anyone who liked Lost has similar weird vibes and only 3 seasons,it's made by the same showrunner and much more focused on its characters than its plot.

    AronDracula posted: »

    I finished the premiere season of Lost on Disney+. This show focuses on survivors of a plane crash who got stranded on an island in the midd

  • Just binged Season 1 of Infinity Train in the past 2 days. It's a good, wacky, intense show.

    I've seen the pilot many times before, but that was years ago. Cool to see most of that recreated in Episode 3 though.
    The rest of the show is strange, mysterious stuff involving the train and the super-weird worlds in each of the cars. I was a bit worried that each episode would only focus on the strange shenanigans of each car, and most of the real plot and mystery-solving would come at the end, but they plant a lot of huge, interesting scenes throughout to keep things fresh.

    Episode 5 is where things really kicked off and hooked me. The strange tapes that chronicle someone's entire life, but can also be used to trap them within their own head? One-One being some sort of creepy caretaker in Episode 6, trying to fix things but inevitably ruining them because of it? The Chrome Car, Chrome police, and that whole episode? Weird but neato. Things just pick up from there, and I especially liked the huge tonal shift from the morbidly happy and child-like Ball Pit Car to the hair-raising appearance of the Conductor, Steward, Cat, and sudden death(-ish) of Atticus.

    Ashley Johnson has some great voice-acting here. She displays some awesome emotion and wonder at both happy, sad, and dumbfounding things.
    I understand the second season follows Mirror Tulip as she tries to escape the train(?), so I'm glad Ashley isn't done with this show yet.

    I was kinda expecting the big twist about One-One to occur, but I didn't expect he'd still be a benevolent conductor. I was getting a lot of Wheatley vibes from him (Portal 2), and I was half-right on that assumption. He's the secret ringleader, but luckily doesn't turn on Tulip in the end.
    Hopefully the rest of the show answers a few more questions, cause there's a lot I'd love to uncover. (Who made those tapes, why? How long has Amelia been on the train? How long was Tulip? Why does the train look so different in the flashback? Is the train on Mars, or some other world?)

  • Glad you're enjoying the show, it only gets better from there!

    The show purposefully leaves certain things ambiguous but Owen Dennis has answered a few of those questions on social media.

    How long has Amelia been on the train? How long was Tulip?

    She's been on the train for over 30 years. Tulip was on the train for five months.

    Why does the train look so different in the flashback?

    The train changes its appearance to fit whoever it appears to.

    Is the train on Mars, or some other world?

    It's some other world but time there runs parallel to Earth.

    AChicken posted: »

    Just binged Season 1 of Infinity Train in the past 2 days. It's a good, wacky, intense show. I've seen the pilot many times before, but t

  • I watched Batman Begins for the first time in ages. Even though I think I should rewatch The Dark Knight first, I gotta say this is probably my favorite Batman movie and yes, I mean the best one of the Nolan trilogy. I just think this movie had the best pacing, I loved Liam Neeson as Ra's Al Ghul, the origins of Batman/Bruce Wayne were done sooo right and the movie felt more like a Batman film than its sequels.

  • I'm not gonna spoil anything about Lost but there has never been a TV episode that shocked me as hard as Season 2 Episode 20.

  • edited March 2021

    City of Ghosts is a darn good chill show. I'd like to say it's the Midnight Gospel, but for kids -- and it's about culture and history rather than spiritualism.
    I'd watch an episode every night before bed. It's nice. It's short.

    Let me break it down:

    • It's an animated show by Elizabeth Ito (with help from Pendleton Ward).
    • It follows a group of kids who help people solve their ghost problems across Los Angeles. Usually it's a family member, a friend, or a previous resident who is too attached with their old life causing trouble for the current residents.
    • The series is in documentary-style, with plenty of interview segments with the guests (and ghosts) of the day.
    • Super cool: The characters in the show are based on and voiced by real LA Residents. I think many of the interviews are taken from the actual people being interviewed, since the character names and cast members' names often line up in the credits.
    • It's got great educational value, in that you can learn about famous LA areas and the history of different cultures moving into the city over the years. My favourite episodes were Tovaangar, about the Indigenous people of LA, and Bob&Nancy, as that's where the show's interview segments "clicked" for me and I realised that most of what's in this show is real. (Such as the history of Atomic Nancy, a famous Japanese-American singer as well as Bob Baker's Marionette Theatre, a real place in LA. Also Nancy's design is sweet. Round and fluffy as normal, but when she's excited, spikes pop out and she gets all colourful.)
    • Some of the interview topics actually (briefly) cover some serious and mature topics, like Japanese internment camps or misogyny in the workplace.
    • Man, I'm so excited for the next generation of kids' entertainment. In this show, there's a non-binary kid who uses They/Them pronouns. I think that's awesome! I never had any of that kind of exposure in my childhood. Teaching kids about the increasing importance of gender identification early on is always great, glad to see it's in this one

  • Currently watching Season 3 of Lost and I gotta ask: is this show turning into Final Destination all of the sudden? Cause there is a character arc which shares almost the same concept.

  • edited April 2021

    I'm warming up to the Animaniacs (and to Pinky and the Brain, for that matter).

    I was heasitant on whether they could make enough good sketch comedy about the modern world, and it's good to know that they don't need to.

    Episode 2 is very historical-focused, with a very entertaining retelling of Homer's Iliad (in which Odysseus comes upon the ferocious Cyclops), featuring the Warners as meddling gods. The Greek references, the surprise rock ballads from sea monsters the trip to Hades, all fun to watch.

    Pinky and the Brain's segment was medieval-focused, with them trying to recruit a ferocious dragon so they can take over a kingdom, and then, the world.
    Problem is, the dragon isn't ferocious, just artistic. He's an actor.
    As an actor-in-training, this segment was particularly entertaining, with how over-dramatic the dragon was and the little jabs at overall arts funding being lackluster for most.

    The episode ended with a musical number about the Suffragettes, or, was supposed to, until Dot learned about how Cartoons can't vote, and marched to Washington to change that. It was a pretty entertaining segment featuring a lot of Looney Tunes guest stars. Fun, but felt a bit like WB was tooting their own horn with their iconic IPs.

    It's either an improvement from the last episode, or I'm gradually easing into the zany of this show. Looking ahead at some future segments, there's a few I'm looking forward to see... Ooh I'm excited!

    Bonus point: the intro shows their fancy new contracts for 2 New Seasons. I wonder when that 2nd season might come out..(And if all the jokes might be 2 years behind again) But I totally get it takes time.

  • edited April 2021

    Finished the first 4 seasons of Lost so far. What can I say? I have been enjoying this show a lot. It's full of awesome plot twists and great character development but I still have more questions than answers. Gotta say, I'm not really a fan of the story not being told in chronological order.

    Season 1-3 were all about flashbacks before the plane crash and now, since S3 finale, the show started giving flashbacks which show the six survivors of Oceanic 815 being off the island and having a new life on the mainland. As far as the characters go, Ben became one of my favorite villains in tv shows and Sawyer went from a hateable character to a redeemed one. He earned all of my respect ever since he saved Claire from the house explosion at the Others' camp and tried to defend Hurley from John who wanted to use him to find Jacob's cabin.

    Also, is this show supposed to be one of the main inspirations for The Walking Dead show? Because I do get vibes of it.

  • I got Korra Season 1 in the bag.

    Mmh, this show is a great continuation to the OG series.

    • The music is fantastic. It's so cinematic, epic and orchestral.
    • The fights in this show are equally awesome, too.
    • I've only ever seen JK Simmons in films, so it's strange seeing him have such a large voice-acting role here. I really like Tenzin (and his children are some awesome comedy relief too.)
    • I was a bit weary at first, but I'm really enjoying this Modern-world look to the ATLA-verse. It's cool to see the creation of planes, the new architecture and how they blend it all into this Asian style. It's unique.
    • The plot with Amon was pretty cool. Nearing the end when you find out he's a bloodbender was super tense.
    • Taking away Korra' s bending felt like an interesting lead into a season 2, but they just reverse that at the very end anyway. I get why -- since this show was only renewed on a season-by-season case -- but I would have enjoyed to see the ramifications of that if Aang-Ex-Machina hadn't showed up.
    • It was a bit hard to not sympathise with the non-benders in this season. (Probably considering that they're the "average human" connection of this show, plus all the debates about Equality happening over the past year). While I think their society should find ways to uplift non-benders to have tools equivalent to skills benders have, I can't blame them for wanting to take the benders down a peg in life, when those are usually the people with the real power to control any room they walk into.
  • I think what you'll find with TLOK, with the exception of one particular villain, is that you'll sympathize with them, or at the very least understand where they're coming from. The villains are honestly the biggest highlight of the show and are usually some of the most fleshed out characters.

    JK Simmons, one of my favorite actors (his performance in Whiplash is fucking amazing, he deserved that Oscar), has actually done quite a few roles for TV, mainly as reoccurring or minor roles. Granted I have not seen all of these shows, but some popular ones are:

    • Infinity Train (@dojo32161 I might have to watch the show now)
    • Gravity Falls
    • Invincible
    • Archer
    • Bojack Horsemen
    • Oz
    • The Closer
    • Ultimate Spider Man (I'll give you one guess as to who he played in the show)
    AChicken posted: »

    I got Korra Season 1 in the bag. Mmh, this show is a great continuation to the OG series. * The music is fantastic. It's so cinemati

  • dojo32161dojo32161 Moderator

    ...

    I think what you'll find with TLOK, with the exception of one particular villain, is that you'll sympathize with them, or at the very least

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